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It’s nice to know we will always have dirt

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s a prissy little girl, I never had any interest in bulldozers and dump trucks. The moving and rearranging of dirt just did not jive with my ruffles and bows.

Conversely, I do remember one of the boys in my childhood neighborhood, Brian Green, was consumed with the big yellow equipment.

In his back yard, there was a creek bed where Brian, his brothers and the rest of the Marion Park gang of boys excavated miniature proportions of mud and dirt.

Brian is now a geologist, so I guess his youthful attention to machinery propelled him into a career of earthly matters.

Like Brain, fragments of my childhood persona remain with me since I still love frills and lace.

Sometimes this has been a real challenge for hubby when it comes to home décor!

Nevertheless, recently I have become intrigued with bulldozers and dirt.

With all the land clearing that has been going on around me, the construction of the new Cannon Toyota facilities off the North Frontage Road and whatever ERDC is doing on Wisconsin Avenue, I think I may be beginning to understand Brian’s and the rest of the subdivision gang’s fascination.

It has been amazing as I pass by on my way to work to see how the men operating these large pieces of equipment are altering the landscape.

On occasion, I have even been tempted to stop and watch them work.

All of this dirt work reminded me of the massive hills that were removed along Highway 61 N. when I was young.

My family and I used to travel this route on our way to visit the grandparents who lived in Cleveland, and through the years, some of those monstrous peaks slowly disappeared. Today, I even find it a challenge to remember what the area looked like before they were removed.

At first, it had been kind of sad to see them go, but I realize now, it had been done to make way for economic growth.

In pondering all these land transformations, I realized that my life too has changed through the years.

I have lived through many hilltop experiences only to be leveled at times with grief. But like Vicksburg, my experiences have made way for new phases of development.

So for all those little boys and “girls” out there, no worries, we will always have bulldozers and dirt.

Thank goodness!

Terri Cowart Frazier is a staff writer for The Vicksburg Post. She can be reached at terri.frazier@vicksburgpost.com.

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Shortly afterward, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter at The Vicksburg Post and is the editor of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, which has been awarded First Place by the Mississippi Press Association. She has also been the recipient of a First Place award in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s editorial division for the “Best Feature Story.”

Terri graduated from Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in public relations.

Prior to coming to work at The Post a little more than 10 years ago, she did some freelancing at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay at home mom.

Terri is a member of the Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a lifetime member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and is a past member of the Sampler Antique Club and Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“From staying informed with local governmental issues to hearing the stories of its people, a hometown newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at The Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I will be able to continue to grow and hone in on my skills as I help share the stories in Vicksburg. When asked what I like most about my job, my answer is always ‘the people.’

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