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Hope is alive and miracles continue today

As I watched the flames tear through the Notre Dame Cathedral and listened to the news commentators talking about the 850-year-old building, I recalled a book I read entitled “Pillars of the Earth.”

Many are familiar with its author, Ken Follett, who in my opinion is a master when it comes to historical fiction.

This particular novel of Follett’s is set in the 12th century, and the story revolves around the building of a Gothic Cathedral.

What I found fascinating in Follett’s book and that I recalled as I watched the iconic Parisian building burn, was the incredible amount of effort and labor it had taken to construct such a beautiful structure.

Not only were the architectural feats amazing, especially since there were no computers or high tech calculators used nearly 900 years ago, but the sheer manpower it must have required to build such a massive church.

In the novel, Follett goes on to describe in detail how workers quarried stone from the ground and then master stonecutters would chisel and shape it for use.

In many of these descriptions as to the construction as well as the architectural terminology used, I had to use Google in order to have a better understanding of the images.

One architectural feature I recall looking up was flying buttresses.

And from aerial shots of the Notre Dame Cathedral, I could see these arches the author spoke of as they were now exposed and naked with no roof protecting them.

The tragedy of this iconic cathedral burning has certainly caused sadness for those living in Paris and for many around the world.

However, in the midst of this sorrow, there seems to be hope.

As of Wednesday, it has been reported one billion dollars have been pledged for the reconstruction of the damaged cathedral.

It seems in times of crises, humanity does come together.

For those of us living in Vicksburg, last weekend we experienced our own disaster as three tornadoes tore through the city.

In these storms, many sustained damage to their property. Fallen trees blocked roads and thousands lost power.

But in this time of loss, we, too, witnessed our own coming together of sorts.

Neighbor was helping neighbor, volunteers from across the state turned out to assist with tree removal and cleanup, while Entergy crews worked tirelessly to restore power.

I don’t know about you, but in this age of political turmoil, it has been encouraging to see that goodness still exists.

So on this Good Friday, we should all be reminded that even in the midst of great loss, Easter comes.

Hope is alive and miracles continue.

Happy Easter!

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Shortly afterward, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter at The Vicksburg Post and is the editor of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, which has been awarded First Place by the Mississippi Press Association. She has also been the recipient of a First Place award in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s editorial division for the “Best Feature Story.”

Terri graduated from Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in public relations.

Prior to coming to work at The Post a little more than 10 years ago, she did some freelancing at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay at home mom.

Terri is a member of the Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a lifetime member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and is a past member of the Sampler Antique Club and Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“From staying informed with local governmental issues to hearing the stories of its people, a hometown newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at The Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I will be able to continue to grow and hone in on my skills as I help share the stories in Vicksburg. When asked what I like most about my job, my answer is always ‘the people.’

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