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Make the commitment to learn the job you’re asking us for

Elections are by their very nature the most stringent of job interviews.

For months those seeking office — or seeking re-election — go door-to-door asking for a job, asking for votes.

For those candidates who are seeking office, there is the hope and expectation of what they can do in office, while those who are seeking re-election must run on their record. It is two sides of the same coin.

For those candidates who are seeking office, there is some unknown of what the job entails, while those running for re-election have direct experience with the challenges and opportunities that come with the job.

In less than a month, voters in Warren County will head to the polls for the general election and make their choices in a number of races, including those deciding each of the five seats on the Warren County Board of Supervisors.

Two incumbents have lost re-election bids, while the three remaining face a host of challengers.

That means that at least two newcomers will join the board after November’s election.

We have been disappointed in the number of new candidates vying for those seats who have not made the commitment to attend the supervisor’s regular meetings.

Monday, during the board’s regularly scheduled first meeting of the month, only one candidate running for one of the seats was in the audience. During previous meetings, one or two other candidates have attended.

There is no higher office in Warren County than a seat on the Board of Supervisors, and it is incumbent that those seeking the office understand what is going on.

Attending the meetings in person ensures those running against incumbents have a firm grasp of what the job entails or what those in the job are doing.

The Warren County Board of Supervisors will have their next regularly scheduled meeting Monday, Oct. 21. We encourage those seeking office to attend.