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SCHF receives grants, prepares for fundraiser

During the weeks and months when the Southern Cultural Heritage Foundation was closed to the public because of the COVID-19 pandemic, director Stacey Mahoney filled the time by applying for grants.

The effort paid off. The SCHF received several grants that have helped it continue operating.

Mahoney was notified in late spring the foundation would receive a $10,000 grant from the Mississippi Humanities Council as part of the CARES Act funding through support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The SCHF also received a grant from the Mississippi Arts Commission as part of the CARES Act. Mahoney said funds have been used for operational costs and to help with payroll.

“And to just help us keep the doors open so we can offer our programs and events like the River Kids After School Art Program, and we are continuing our Classics in the Courtyard in the fall,” Mahoney said. “The programs we are able to have is a lot in part due to our grants that we have gotten, which have helped us to keep going when we don’t have our workshops and the things people pay to go to.”

The foundation also applied for and received funding through the Payment Protection Program and the Economic Injury Disaster Loan.

The Southern Cultural Heritage Foundation is a non-profit organization committed to preserving the history and architecture of the Southern Cultural Heritage Center, while providing all citizens with the opportunity to experience cultural, educational and artistic programs.

“We are extremely grateful and appreciative of the National Endowment for Humanities as well as the Mississippi Humanities Council for this CARES Act funding. We are also appreciative of the support given to the humanities from our congressional representatives. That’s where it really got voted in.” Mahoney said.

Next weekend, the SCHF will hold one of its biggest fundraisers of the year when it stages the 32nd Annual Over the River Run on Oct. 10. The 5-mile run and race walk across the Old Highway 80 Bridge normally draws as many as 800 people — this year’s event will be limited to 400 because of COVID-19 restrictions — and Mahoney said it is crucial to the SCHF.

The 2020 Over the River Run will begin at 8 a.m. on Oct. 10. The registration fee is $30 by Oct. 1, or $35 between Oct. 2 and Oct. 8. The fee goes up to $40 on Oct. 9. Registration information is available at southernculture.org, and runners and walkers can also register in person at the SCHF office at 1302 Adams St.

“This is, by far, our biggest fundraiser that we have. So it is very, very important. We have become reliant on the funds we bring in from the Over the River Run to pump into these five historic buildings which cost a lot of money to keep up and preserve,” Mahoney said. “And then, of course, offering the programs that we do. So many of them are free, and the ones that aren’t free are low-cost to the community. That is vital for us to continue our mission — especially after a rough year.”

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Shortly afterward, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter at The Vicksburg Post and is the editor of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, which has been awarded First Place by the Mississippi Press Association. She has also been the recipient of a First Place award in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s editorial division for the “Best Feature Story.”

Terri graduated from Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in public relations.

Prior to coming to work at The Post a little more than 10 years ago, she did some freelancing at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay at home mom.

Terri is a member of the Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a lifetime member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and is a past member of the Sampler Antique Club and Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“From staying informed with local governmental issues to hearing the stories of its people, a hometown newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at The Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I will be able to continue to grow and hone in on my skills as I help share the stories in Vicksburg. When asked what I like most about my job, my answer is always ‘the people.’

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