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Local mail carrier steps away from route to deliver support to her family

While it’s not official, the phrase, “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night” is a motto often used to describe the dedication of a mail carrier.

Patsy Larry, who delivers the mail in Vicksburg, has added “friendly and caring” to the creed. Word even has it Larry knows the names of all the dogs along her route.

“I try to know most of the names so if they ever want to try to act up,” Larry laughed, “I can holler at them.”

Larry began her career with the postal service in 1994 and credits the people she delivers mail to each day for making her job so enjoyable.

But for two months, Larry stepped away from her route to deliver something far more important than letters and packages. She had to deliver support to her family.

In July, Larry’s grandson, Brody, was diagnosed with a rare form of childhood developmental brain cancer called Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma, also known as DIPG.

DIPG is a highly aggressive brain tumor and accounts for 10 percent of all childhood central nervous system tumors. Approximately 300 children in the U. S. are diagnosed with DIPG, most often when they are between 5 and 9 years old.

Brody, who is 6, is at St. Jude Children’s Medical and Research Center in Memphis, Tenn. In an effort to provide moral support to her daughter and Brody’s mother, Bridgett, Larry went to be with them.

“(Bridgett) had been told something devastating and the hospital staff knew we needed each other,” Larry said. St. Jude made an exception for her to be with her daughter and grandson even with the current COVID-19 restrictions. “The doctor worked it out and they let me stay.”

For more than two months, Larry was in Memphis with her daughter and grandson. While there, she spent her nights at the Ronald McDonald House, where she said she was treated well.

“Just like they say on all the commercials,” she said.

In addition to the support from the Ronald McDonald House Charities, Larry said she has had a lot of support from her family.

“And I have a lot of co-workers who have all rallied behind me,” Larry said. “They took up money. My daughter is not working and I had to do a lot for her, but we made it, though.”

As for Brody, “Ooh! He has the biggest personality and he is not afraid of anyone,” she said. “He can hold a conversation with adults. He is just that type of guy, an all-around great kid and smart kid and anybody that knows him likes him.”

Larry said her grandson has had a “great” attitude while at St. Jude.

“He is taking it like a champ,” she said.

Brody is a student at Dana Road Elementary School and would have been in first grade this year if not for his diagnosis.  Larry, whose routes include portions of downtown Vicksburg, has since returned to delivering the mail each day.

For anyone who would like to help out with expenses the family has incurred, a GOFUNDme has been set up under Bridgett H. Larry at www.gofundme.com/f/fz4amt-brody-strong.

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Shortly afterward, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter at The Vicksburg Post and is the editor of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, which has been awarded First Place by the Mississippi Press Association. She has also been the recipient of a First Place award in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s editorial division for the “Best Feature Story.”

Terri graduated from Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in public relations.

Prior to coming to work at The Post a little more than 10 years ago, she did some freelancing at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay at home mom.

Terri is a member of the Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a lifetime member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and is a past member of the Sampler Antique Club and Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“From staying informed with local governmental issues to hearing the stories of its people, a hometown newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at The Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I will be able to continue to grow and hone in on my skills as I help share the stories in Vicksburg. When asked what I like most about my job, my answer is always ‘the people.’

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