• 91°

FRAZIER: Make no bones about it, you can’t turn back the clock

It’s just downright hard to believe it’s June.

During the height of the pandemic, the world seemed to be at a standstill, but with the rollout of the vaccines, it seems like time is just flying by.

Or maybe it’s just the aging process that makes me more aware of how precious time can be. While there have certainly been days that I thought would never end, they come fewer and farther in between, now.

There is an irony in growing older. While the days and months are racing by, the body is stuck in second gear. My get-up and go is still there. It’s just that it takes a while for me to get my motor running. So enough with all the idioms. There is time for them later — or is there?

I think one thing that has become clear (I restrained myself from adding in crystal) with the pandemic is that life is uncertain and if I procrastinate — put the things I want to do and people in my life I want to be around on hold — I may miss out.

How many of us think, “I’ll do it tomorrow or when I have more time?”

Time, remember, does not stand still and wait for us to catch up. It keeps on going (like the Energizer Bunny). Therefore, before you know it, days, months and even years you thought you had are gone.

In 1987, Nike came out with one of the best slogans, ever: “Just Do It.” Those three little words sound so simple, but yet “just doing it” is hard for me. In a quest to figure out why “just do it” is a challenge, I ran across a quote from Salvador Dali in a blog I was reading that related to the philosophy behind the phrase.

Dali said, “Have no fear of perfection, you’ll never reach it.”

But oh how I’ve tried; tried to make a perfect home, create the perfect yard or to write the perfect column!

“But this pursuit of perfection breeds impotence,” the blogger wrote, adding, “You need to get ok with imperfect and just do it.”

This doesn’t mean to not try and do your best, but realize, he said,  “Absolute perfection is an unobtainable state.”

This is great food for thought, especially when life gets busy and you’re thinking there is no time to stop and smell the roses.

It has been said, “Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by every moment that takes your breath away.”

I certainly don’t want to be left high and dry from all of life’s special moments therefore before my ship sails. So, I am going to try and pay closer attention to the ticking of the clock and aim for putting first things first and just do it.

Because before I know it, I will be staring down June 2022.

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Shortly afterward, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter at The Vicksburg Post and is the editor of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, which has been awarded First Place by the Mississippi Press Association. She has also been the recipient of a First Place award in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s editorial division for the “Best Feature Story.”

Terri graduated from Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in public relations.

Prior to coming to work at The Post a little more than 10 years ago, she did some freelancing at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay at home mom.

Terri is a member of the Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a lifetime member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and is a past member of the Sampler Antique Club and Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“From staying informed with local governmental issues to hearing the stories of its people, a hometown newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at The Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I will be able to continue to grow and hone in on my skills as I help share the stories in Vicksburg. When asked what I like most about my job, my answer is always ‘the people.’

email author More by Terri Cowart