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Frazier: Memories of camping in simpler times

It’s hard for me to believe that I used to love camping.

And I don’t mean the kind of camping where you travel around in an air-conditioned luxury RV.

I mean the kind of camping where you either pitched a tent or bunked up in a cabin.

Now, the closest thing I do that even compares to camping is when I stay with dear friends in their home on the farm.

Camping became less attractive to me when I hit puberty and realized I liked boys.

Before that, I had no problem waking up with a Phyllis Diller hairdo — (for those of you too young to know who Phyllis Diller is, Google her), wearing a hand-painted macaroni necklace or walking around with calamine lotion all over my bug-bitten legs.

But when boys came into focus and the thought of having no electrical outlet for the blow dryer or telephone service came across my mind, camping became a thing of the past.

However, memories flood back to my good old camping days every time I encounter a pine tree.

Its smell immediately transports me back to the campfires that were built, the songs that were sung and the fellowship of a group of girls that will always be near and dear.

I was in Girl Scout Troop 229 with Ida Haworth and Susan Embry as the leaders. Those two women took us on countless campouts. One summer, we camped all the way to Washington D.C. and back.

It was very educational. On our way, we made a stop in Savannah, Ga., the birthplace of Juliette Gordon Low, who was the founder of Girl Scouts and we toured Thomas Jefferson’s home, Monticello in Virginia.

In those pre-boy years, I was also a camper at Warner Tully — one year even serving as a counselor in training, and as with my Girl Scout days, those years there were also great.

Summertime is a reprieve from school for kids with some attending camps and for others, it is a time to enjoy a family vacation.

In the upcoming July/ August edition of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, we are once again reaching out to readers to become a part of the magazine by sending us a photograph of a favorite vacation or camp picture. These pictures can be current or vintage and we need them soon, like by today. Thankfully with the internet, this is possible.

You are welcome to email the pictures directly to me at terri.frazier@vicskburgpost.com or to www.vicksburgpost.com/summerfun.

Although camping is not on my to-do list anymore, I relish the memories and will never consider those days any less fun than the vacations I take now where there is running water and air-conditioning.

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Shortly afterward, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter at The Vicksburg Post and is the editor of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, which has been awarded First Place by the Mississippi Press Association. She has also been the recipient of a First Place award in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s editorial division for the “Best Feature Story.”

Terri graduated from Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in public relations.

Prior to coming to work at The Post a little more than 10 years ago, she did some freelancing at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay at home mom.

Terri is a member of the Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a lifetime member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and is a past member of the Sampler Antique Club and Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“From staying informed with local governmental issues to hearing the stories of its people, a hometown newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at The Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I will be able to continue to grow and hone in on my skills as I help share the stories in Vicksburg. When asked what I like most about my job, my answer is always ‘the people.’

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