TEACHER OF THE YEAR: Elizabeth Gullett teaches for all learning styles

Published 8:00 am Wednesday, February 23, 2022

By Vera Ann Fedell | The Vicksburg Post

This article is part of a series by The Vicksburg Post, in partnership with the Vicksburg-Warren County Chamber of Commerce, featuring each of the nominees for teacher of the year honors.

Elizabeth Gullett, a Porter’s Chapel Academy math teacher, gears her lessons to help all types of learners.

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“One of my main goals is to try and reach every student through the many resources available today and show them they can learn and be successful in math, and hopefully have a little fun,” Gullett said.

Gullett is a finalist for the Vicksburg-Warren County Chamber of Commerce’s Educator of the Year award. The chamber will select and announce one elementary and one secondary teacher of the year at the chamber luncheon, which has been rescheduled to Mar. 1. The winner of each award will receive $1,000 from Ameristar Casino and the runner-up for each award will receive $500 from Mutual Credit Union. 

Gullett began teaching in 1979 as a junior high math and business teacher at Central Hinds Academy in Raymond, Miss. In 1983, she taught at Warren Central Junior High School as a math and business teacher. Gullett began teaching at Porter’s Chapel Academy as a Junior High School math teacher in 1989. Starting in 2002, she taught at Warren Central High School as a transition to algebra and algebra I teacher. In 2019, Gullett returned to Porter’s Chapel Academy as a pre-algebra and algebra I teacher. 

Gullet received a Bachelor of Science degree in business education from Mississippi College in 1978. She then received a Master of Education in secondary education from Mississippi College in 1979. 

As stated in her Educator of the Year application, Gullett enjoys teaching her lesson on slopes. In this lesson, she has students stack several books of various sizes, then lay a ruler with one end on top of the book and the other on the desk. Students then use another ruler to help find the slope. This demonstration helps students who are auditory, visual and kinesthetic learners to understand the lesson. 

“I truly believe if I can get each student interested in the lesson we are studying (by hands-on activities, videos or other investigative activities) learning will take place,” Gullett said.