FRAZIER: Drawing painful similarities after an emotional week

Published 4:00 am Saturday, May 28, 2022

When I was first given the opportunity to share my voice with a weekly column, I thought I had arrived.

While having a byline run above a story I had written was rewarding, it is a whole other tier of gratification to have the honor of sharing your own personal perspective.

Writing a column has allowed me a platform in which I have had the privilege to analyze, characterize, emphasize reflect, suggest and, on some occasions, pontificate.

Sign up for The Vicksburg Post's free newsletter

Receive daily headlines and obituaries

No doubt, my thoughts and views have not always been appreciated by everyone and certainly, there has been a reader or two who found themselves bored with my musings.

I realize, as in life, there is no way to please everyone with my columns, but also, likewise in life, I feel what I write needs to be reflective of my authentic self — not an impersonator trying to impress and amaze the masses.

I say all this because this week, though there are local aspects I could focus on and highlight, the horror of the Uvalde school shooting is stifling the positive thoughts.

On Tuesday, May 24, hours before an 18-year-old shooter entered the school building, many parents, grandparents, and friends were there attending end-of-the-year award ceremonies held for their children.

I had done just the same last week.

Beechwood Elementary School was having its kindergarten recognition service and I was there to support my youngest grandson.

Typically, at any of the schools here in Vicksburg, doors are locked, and entry is only allowed if someone from inside buzzes you in.

But on May 20, the doors were unlocked, like at Uvalde, for guests to enter.

Once the program was over, adults began to leave with some taking their little ones with them.

I remember my grandson asking his mom if he, too, could leave with her.

The answer had been no because she was heading back to work.

My guess is some of the young students at Robb Elementary School had done the same when their programs were done. And likewise, their parent or parents told them they had to return to work.

I am sure, they are thinking, ‘If only I had said yes.’

Since the mass shooting, I have watched and listened to televised gut-wrenching accounts from those affected.

And also in the midst of trying to make sense of the tragedy, I have listened to reports of blame being placed and political agendas being pushed as to why and how the atrocity occurred.

My column would surely be the place I could weigh in on the cause and remedies needed to stop mass shootings, but unlike some politicians who think they have a cure for the cause, I don’t know.

All I do know is that there are parents grieving and my heart hurts for them. And I pray that not only will they one day find healing from this pain, but also that we as a country will get over ourselves and figure out what is most important.

That is my opinion.

About Terri Cowart Frazier

Terri Frazier was born in Cleveland. Shortly afterward, the family moved to Vicksburg. She is a part-time reporter at The Vicksburg Post and is the editor of the Vicksburg Living Magazine, which has been awarded First Place by the Mississippi Press Association. She has also been the recipient of a First Place award in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s editorial division for the “Best Feature Story.”

Terri graduated from Warren Central High School and Mississippi State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in communications with an emphasis in public relations.

Prior to coming to work at The Post a little more than 10 years ago, she did some freelancing at the Jackson Free Press. But for most of her life, she enjoyed being a full-time stay at home mom.

Terri is a member of the Crawford Street United Methodist Church. She is a lifetime member of the Vicksburg Junior Auxiliary and is a past member of the Sampler Antique Club and Town and Country Garden Club. She is married to Dr. Walter Frazier.

“From staying informed with local governmental issues to hearing the stories of its people, a hometown newspaper is vital to a community. I have felt privileged to be part of a dedicated team at The Post throughout my tenure and hope that with theirs and with local support, I will be able to continue to grow and hone in on my skills as I help share the stories in Vicksburg. When asked what I like most about my job, my answer is always ‘the people.’

email author More by Terri Cowart